SkyDrive or iCloud? The pros and cons of both

By Kip Kniskern | Posted June 7, 2011 55 comments

iCloudYesterday Steve Jobs gave us the most detailed view so far of Apple’s iCloud, a file sync/backup/sharing service coming to iOS (read: iPhone, iPad) this fall.  Microsoft similarly has been revamping SkyDrive, placing it more firmly at the center of its consumer cloud services, and planning a more seamless experience for SkyDrive and Windows Phone with the upcoming Mango update.  We’re expecting to hear more about Microsoft services like MyPhone and Live Mesh, too, all part of the Microsoft syncing/cloud storage ecosystem.

Today, Mike Torres recaps what’s currently available with SkyDrive in a post on Inside Windows Live, and what’s upcoming with Mango.  Of course we’ve also been telling you about how SkyDrive will become more of a centerpiece with Windows Live Wave 5, showing up in the header, with a single entry point for all your cloud based files.

overview_buckets_whatis(From What is iCloud? on Apple.com)

So which service is better?  Of course first of all it depends on which “ecosystem” you’re invested in, but if you’re looking to get into the smartphone market, cloud based services could be a tipping point in whether to go Apple or Microsoft.  Let’s take a look at some of the key features of both services:

Music
Afraid there just isn’t much comparison here, at least in terms of popularity.  Apple owns the online music biz, and iTunes dominates the space.  New features in iCloud will, for the first time, allow users to re-download purchased music for any of your Apple devices.  PC World describes the service as part of a slideshow on what’s new in iCloud:

Any apps you purchased will be available for redownload on any iOS device via a purchase-history menu, and you can have iCloud automatically push new purchases to all your devices. iCloud includes 5GB of free cloud storage for Mail, Document Storage, and Backup. Purchased music, apps, and books, as well as Photo Stream content, do not count against the storage limit.

iCloud doesn’t store your music in the cloud, it stores your iTunes purchase history, and for an additional $25/year, you can scan and match all of your music, purchased anywhere, and if it’s in iTunes, you’ll be able to download those songs to any iOS device you own.  This is somewhat brilliant, we think, as it saves Apple from being a depository for millions (billions?) of copies of the same music, instead serving music out of a central repository to anyone with the proper access.

At the same time, the Zune approach, with Zune Pass (and others like Skype’s Rdio, Spotify, MOG, and others) moves away from the music purchase model altogether, giving you access to all of the music available to the service, for a fee.  We’ve even seen hints of a SkyDrive music experience.  If you’ve purchased lots of music on iTunes, well you’re kind of locked in (that’s the whole idea).  But, as Frederic Lardinois asks at SiliconFilter.com, is the music purchase model outdated?

three_screens2

(From Paul Thurrott’s Three Screens: Celebrating Microsoft’s Cohesive New User Experience Strategy)

Backup
iCloud is going to back up all your iOS devices with all your Apple stuff: calendar, email (well me.com email), contacts, (iWork) documents, Apps, and iBooks.  Steve Jobs says “you won’t have to do anything”.  Well, except totally buy into the Apple system, that is.  SkyDrive, and what we believe to be coming in MyPhone “version 2”, isn’t so restrictive.  We’re still waiting to hear about what Microsoft has in store with Live Mesh, too.  Hotmail has made great strides in integrating other email services like Gmail, and is one of the biggest email services in the world (does me.com even rank?).  Windows Phone can treat contacts from other services, including Facebook, the same as Hotmail or Exchange contacts, and we’re coming to the documents part of the equation…

Documents
The new SkyDrive (some pundits are saying we’ll be seeing it in June, but we’re still waiting) is going to allow 25gb of storage for all your files, all accessible in one place.  Photos, Office docs, PDFs, music (how this plays out is yet to be seen), any kind of file you want, can be stored in the cloud.  Accessed from anywhere (just about literally anywhere, all you need is a browser, or even an iPhone app like OneNote for iPhone), and depending on what the “SkyDrive application” that Brian Hall mentioned last week turns out to be, SkyDrive files may be far more easily managed from your PC or your devices.

iCloud takes a much more restrictive approach to Documents, too.  The docs are restricted to iWork documents; Pages, Numbers, and Keyword (and really, who even uses those?).  No word on even syncing Office for Mac documents.  In any case, SkyDrive will be far more open and accessible, no matter what kind of files you’re storing.

Photos
As we’ve moved from a totally PC centric world to one where devices made and used almost entirely for consumption and not creation (the iPad is a great example), the one area where consumers continue to create, and create prolifically, is with photos.  Digital photography was big before the advent of the iPhone and other smartphones with built in cameras and easy access to web upload, but now it’s REALLY big.  Those photos can become priceless, and a sure fire way of making sure we can not only capture, but keep our precious memories is ever more important.

iCloud takes an interesting approach to photo storage.  Photos are synced between all your devices and on iCloud servers, with some caveats.  Your device will retain the last 1000 photos you took, although you’ll be able to create folders and keep your favorites on your devices.  iCloud will store the last 30 days of your photos – enough time to share new experiences and get them synced to your Mac, but after that, they’ll be replaced by newer photos, apparently.  No word on permanent cloud storage, even as a paid alternative.

SkyDrive on the other hand gives you 25 gb of storage to do with what you want.  Seamless sync isn’t possible (yet, will it be coming?), although you can choose to automatically upload photos from your Windows Phone to SkyDrive (or to Facebook, for that matter).

The Experience
Apple has built an easy, elegant solution with iCloud, with the usual provisions: you buy totally into the Apple ecosystem and you do it their way.  If you do, iCloud is going to make your life quite a bit easier, and at the same time be manageable for Apple, who even as they are making huge investments in data centers, are very much late to this game.  Amazon, Google, and Microsoft all have far more experience and far more hardware invested in cloud based services, but Apple’s unique approach to music and photos storage may just be a smarter way to do cloud storage (as long as you do it their way, of course).

Microsoft, with Windows Phone, SkyDrive and Hotmail, can even now provide similar services to Apple, but lack the simplicity and elegance.  Sometimes better features aren’t better, if they don’t work seamlessly well together.  With Windows Phone Mango, a new SkyDrive, and Windows Live Wave 5, all expected to arrive at about the same time as iCloud and iOS 5, will we get better features AND a seamless experience, and will it make a difference in the marketplace?

Posted June 7th, 2011 at 12:26 pm
Category: News
Tags: Apple, Hotmail, SkyDrive, Windows Phone
  • Max

    Oh please. You forgot one more thing: iCLoud doesen’t have ads, while Windows Live is filled with ugly gigantic banners. The design of web-site is awful. It’s hard to navigate. Hotmail cuts long filenames. When someone sends me file called “Presentation of our new fatburger.pptx” I receive file called “Presentat…..pptx”. Also Apple cloud is like Windows Live Mesh. It syncs your data. They are always the same on all devices. While skydrive is an online-storage: no internet connection – no data.
    And the last one: compare names: “iCloud” vs. “Windows Live SkyDrive” I prefer first. It is shorter.

  • Max

    Oh please. You forgot one more thing: iCLoud doesen’t have ads, while Windows Live is filled with ugly gigantic banners. The design of web-site is awful. It’s hard to navigate. Hotmail cuts long filenames. When someone sends me file called “Presentation of our new fatburger.pptx” I receive file called “Presentat…..pptx”. Also Apple cloud is like Windows Live Mesh. It syncs your data. They are always the same on all devices. While skydrive is an online-storage: no internet connection – no data.
    And the last one: compare names: “iCloud” vs. “Windows Live SkyDrive” I prefer first. It is shorter.

  • Ckiszka

    @Max – Windows Live = Free, iCloud = Not Free. BTW you
    can upgrade your Live account to have no ads. Live Mesh (part of the Live suite)
    will sync your data among devices as well as keep a copy in the cloud, so the
    “no internet connection – no data” argument is out the window. There
    are many more features I don’t think you are aware of as well (Remote Desktop
    Support, Live Office, etcetera). You may want to read up a little more on the
    products before you condemn them…

    • Gh

       iCloud is free.  Speaking of reading up…

      • http://doctorwhofan98.wordpress.com/ doctorwhofan98

        Apple are going, eventually, charge for iCloud. I read it on Macworld.

      • Matthewmsft

        iCloud is free for 5 Gigs. SkyDrive is free for 25 Gigs. Speaking of reading up…

    • Eduardo Cedillo Martínez

      You are the dumbest troll of the internet, iCloud is free…

      • Matthewmsft

        once again, icloud = free 5 gigs. skydrive = free 25 gigs

        • S. Mulji

          You are only partially correct.  The iCloud 5GB limit only applies to mail, documents, Camera Roll, account information, settings, and other app data.  Your purchased iTunes apps, music, iBooks & the Photostream option don’t apply to the 5GB limit.  They are over and above the 5GB limit.

          So in reality you are getting quite a bit more than 5GB when you start adding it all up.

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_LWH5D6YSCUJPHG6H7BKCVWPZ3M Heliopolis

            “… iTunes apps, music, iBooks …”

            Those aren’t stored in “your” cloud, as they are the same files for everybody. That’s like saying that you have several terabytes of cloud storage with Spotify.

  • Ckiszka

    @Max – Windows Live = Free, iCloud = Not Free. BTW you
    can upgrade your Live account to have no ads. Live Mesh (part of the Live suite)
    will sync your data among devices as well as keep a copy in the cloud, so the
    “no internet connection – no data” argument is out the window. There
    are many more features I don’t think you are aware of as well (Remote Desktop
    Support, Live Office, etcetera). You may want to read up a little more on the
    products before you condemn them…

    • Gh

       iCloud is free.  Speaking of reading up…

      • http://alexsimkin.tumblr.com/ Alex Simkin

        Apple are going, eventually, charge for iCloud. I read it on Macworld.

        Update: But I might be wrong…

      • matthewthepc

        iCloud is free for 5 Gigs. SkyDrive is free for 25 Gigs. Speaking of reading up…

    • Eduardo Cedillo Martínez

      You are the dumbest troll of the internet, iCloud is free…

      • matthewthepc

        once again, icloud = free 5 gigs. skydrive = free 25 gigs

        • S. Mulji

          You are only partially correct.  The iCloud 5GB limit only applies to mail, documents, Camera Roll, account information, settings, and other app data.  Your purchased iTunes apps, music, iBooks & the Photostream option don’t apply to the 5GB limit.  They are over and above the 5GB limit.

          So in reality you are getting quite a bit more than 5GB when you start adding it all up.

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_LWH5D6YSCUJPHG6H7BKCVWPZ3M Heliopolis

            “… iTunes apps, music, iBooks …”

            Those aren’t stored in “your” cloud, as they are the same files for everybody. That’s like saying that you have several terabytes of cloud storage with Spotify.

  • Eduardo Cedillo Martínez

    Clearly you don’t know how the iPad works. It is both for creation and consumption, with 96k apps there’s something for everything. Also, it’s up to developers to make use of iCloud, so if Microsoft wants to use it on their Office apps, they can, you don’t have to use iWork. Also, iWork is compatible with Office docs. And don’t get me started to how it ACTUALLY works Skydrive, because it’s pure shit. You are comparing a product that will ship and putting it along with rumors about features that we don’t even know yet. About the photos, you can use iCloud storage to store them, and YES you can buy more storage if you want.

    All this article is based on rumors, “what we believe this is going to be”, “the rumored new…” “what we hope Microsoft will launch this summer” “we’ve seen hints” etc. The truth is, the actual reality is shittier than that.

    BTW, with Windows Live Hotmail you can’t use IMAP, so most of the clients that aren’t blessed by Microsoft are out.

    • http://www.LiveSide.net Kip Kniskern – LiveSide.net

      Thanks for the comments!  We all consume more than we create these days, in part because there’s so much more to consume.  The iPad was built (brilliantly) to serve that purpose, but I couldn’t imagine, say, creating a complicated website or even writing long form blog posts on an iPad, some tasks just make more sense with a keyboard.  But there’s a whole lot that iPad can do, something Microsoft missed the boat on, no argument there.

      I wouldn’t be a bit surprised to see Microsoft expand their iPad/iPhone offerings for Office and Windows Live: the Bing iPad app has been one of its most popular and well respected apps, and we expect more to come.

      iWork is compatible with Office Docs, that isn’t to say it works well.  And again, no one but a few die hard Apple fanboys use iWork – the vast majority uses Office, with Google Docs a distant (but still far ahead of iWork) second.  Not too much to worry about with server load backing up iWork docs, that’s for sure ;).

      We’ve long been advocates of Microsoft doing more with SkyDrive, we’ve been following it since it was known internally as Live Drive. While Apple unveiled iCloud, it hasn’t shipped either, we agree a full comparison can’t occur until we have both products “in hand”.

      I didn’t find any mention of paid cloud storage for photos at Apple.com/iCloud, will look further.

      And finally, the actual reality of what Apple is shipping now is Mobile.me, not iCloud.  Ask Steve Jobs what he thinks of Apple’s current offering.  Care to compare SkyDrive to Mobile.me?   

      • Eduardo Cedillo Martínez

        Thank you for your reply, in my experience, I’ve tried hard to use Office on Mac but it is really an unpleasant experience. It is slow, full of icons and functions all crammed into a little space. I use it mainly for compatibility purposes. That said, it is the most feature-rich office suite. That is wonderful on the work, and I can’t imagine myself using iWork to manage spreadsheets or really big databases as I do on the office. However, for casual needs, and if you are an Apple user, iWork is by far the best solution. 

        And yeah, MobileMe sucks right now, however, I’ve followed Microsoft for years and they have disappointed me; they usually take the over promise-underdeliver approach. I guess it’s just the stupid bureaucracy that stabs to dead all the creativity and doesn’t let Microsoft reach its full potential. That’s one of the reasons I changed to Apple, because I’ve lost faith with all the potential that Microsoft wastes, courier a good example.

        I’ve tried hard to like the whole Windows Live suit. I use Windows Live ID, Windows Live Hotmail, and Windows Live Messenger. However I completely despise Hotmail, it’s been really hard to manage it: first because there’s no IMAP support (this is big, It’s not compatible with Linux or most phones or email clients), second because the website is based on some weird technology that doesn’t work well with most broswers, I’m having trouble all the time trying to download attachments from Chrome, hopefully with the new HTML5 thing that’s been going on at Microsoft they will change that. WLM is a good desktop product, I have no mayor annoyances with it, it just works. 

        However there are some weird spots in Microsoft strategy, one example is that Windows 7 comes with Windows Gallery, and so my relatives are always asking me about where they should open their files, what are the differences between WG and WLG and so on.

        I tried to use Windows Live Office or whatever it is called but I was drowned with options and services from Windows live 360 to Office Live to Workspace and the differences are not well documented so I simply gave up on the whole thing.

      • Eduardo Cedillo Martínez

        I wrote a lengthy reply but somehow it just vanished in the air

        Correction: it was a Discus error

  • Eduardo Cedillo Martínez

    Clearly you don’t know how the iPad works. It is both for creation and consumption, with 96k apps there’s something for everything.

    • http://www.LiveSide.net Kip Kniskern – LiveSide.net

      Thanks for the comments!  We all consume more than we create these days, in part because there’s so much more to consume.  The iPad was built (brilliantly) to serve that purpose, but I couldn’t imagine, say, creating a complicated website or even writing long form blog posts on an iPad, some tasks just make more sense with a keyboard.  But there’s a whole lot that iPad can do, something Microsoft missed the boat on, no argument there.

      I wouldn’t be a bit surprised to see Microsoft expand their iPad/iPhone offerings for Office and Windows Live: the Bing iPad app has been one of its most popular and well respected apps, and we expect more to come.

      iWork is compatible with Office Docs, that isn’t to say it works well.  And again, no one but a few die hard Apple fanboys use iWork – the vast majority uses Office, with Google Docs a distant (but still far ahead of iWork) second.  Not too much to worry about with server load backing up iWork docs, that’s for sure ;).

      We’ve long been advocates of Microsoft doing more with SkyDrive, we’ve been following it since it was known internally as Live Drive. While Apple unveiled iCloud, it hasn’t shipped either, we agree a full comparison can’t occur until we have both products “in hand”.

      I didn’t find any mention of paid cloud storage for photos at Apple.com/iCloud, will look further.

      And finally, the actual reality of what Apple is shipping now is Mobile.me, not iCloud.  Ask Steve Jobs what he thinks of Apple’s current offering.  Care to compare SkyDrive to Mobile.me?   

      • Eduardo Cedillo Martínez

        Thank you for your reply, in my experience, I’ve tried hard to use Office on Mac but it is really an unpleasant experience. It is slow, full of icons and functions all crammed into a little space. I use it mainly for compatibility purposes. That said, it is the most feature-rich office suite. That is wonderful on the work, and I can’t imagine myself using iWork to manage spreadsheets or really big databases as I do on the office. However, for casual needs, and if you are an Apple user, iWork is by far the best solution. 

        And yeah, MobileMe sucks right now, however, I’ve followed Microsoft for years and they have disappointed me; they usually take the over promise-underdeliver approach. I guess it’s just the stupid bureaucracy that stabs to dead all the creativity and doesn’t let Microsoft reach its full potential. That’s one of the reasons I changed to Apple, because I’ve lost faith with all the potential that Microsoft wastes, courier a good example.

        I’ve tried hard to like the whole Windows Live suit. I use Windows Live ID, Windows Live Hotmail, and Windows Live Messenger. However I completely despise Hotmail, it’s been really hard to manage it: first because there’s no IMAP support (this is big, It’s not compatible with Linux or most phones or email clients), second because the website is based on some weird technology that doesn’t work well with most broswers, I’m having trouble all the time trying to download attachments from Chrome, hopefully with the new HTML5 thing that’s been going on at Microsoft they will change that. WLM is a good desktop product, I have no mayor annoyances with it, it just works. 

        However there are some weird spots in Microsoft strategy, one example is that Windows 7 comes with Windows Gallery, and so my relatives are always asking me about where they should open their files, what are the differences between WG and WLG and so on.

        I tried to use Windows Live Office or whatever it is called but I was drowned with options and services from Windows live 360 to Office Live to Workspace and there differences are not well documented so I simply gave up on the whole thing.

      • Eduardo Cedillo Martínez

        I wrote a lengthy reply but somehow it just vanished in the air.

  • matthewthepc

    iCloud would best be likened to Live Mesh. or you could just use SDExplorer :)

  • Matthewmsft

    iCloud would best be likened to Live Mesh. or you could just use SDExplorer :)

  • http://codereflect.com @sarat

    you should not compare between these two services as SkyDrive is Microsoft’s failed cloud solution and they’re not going to get popular any sooner.

  • Anonymous

    you should not compare between these two services as SkyDrive is Microsoft’s failed cloud solution and they’re not going to get popular any sooner.

  • Sean_SSSS

    Don’t think I’ll bother trying to add anything constructive here. All the replies are from the Maca Nostra Apple zeolots who cannot see beyond the end of their long brown jobs worshiping tongues are never going to be convinced by anyone. Not unless the almighty Steve tells the to.25$ every year to buy your own music again! Jeez, time the EU did something to slap THEM down. Written from my android phone and synched to hotmail.

  • Sean_SSSS

    Don’t think I’ll bother trying to add anything constructive here. All the replies are from the Maca Nostra Apple zeolots who cannot see beyond the end of their long brown jobs worshiping tongues are never going to be convinced by anyone. Not unless the almighty Steve tells the to.25$ every year to buy your own music again! Jeez, time the EU did something to slap THEM down. Written from my android phone and synched to hotmail.

  • Eric

    “SkyDrive on the other hand gives you 25 gb of storage to do with what you want.  Seamless sync isn’t possible (yet, will it be coming?),”
    That’s not entirely true. You can use mesh to sync 5 GB of that back and forth from your computer. I’ve been doing this since the first live mesh beta (which had a VERY nice UI, letting you browse all your online files in a sort of virtual desktop feel, still kind of ticked off they axed that for skydrive, hoping it comes back in the next version of live lol). I’ve got this syncing across seamlessly. I’ve also been using SugarSync on my android to sync my photos/files from there to home/online storage as well. All this is seamless, very easy to set up. SugarSync also has an app for iPhone, so even for iOS, apple hasn’t created anything new here lol.

  • http://profiles.google.com/eric.dunnc Eric Dunn-Cuillierrier

    “SkyDrive on the other hand gives you 25 gb of storage to do with what you want.  Seamless sync isn’t possible (yet, will it be coming?),”
    That’s not entirely true. You can use mesh to sync 5 GB of that back and forth from your computer. I’ve been doing this since the first live mesh beta (which had a VERY nice UI, letting you browse all your online files in a sort of virtual desktop feel, still kind of ticked off they axed that for skydrive, hoping it comes back in the next version of live lol). I’ve got this syncing across seamlessly. I’ve also been using SugarSync on my android to sync my photos/files from there to home/online storage as well. All this is seamless, very easy to set up. SugarSync also has an app for iPhone, so even for iOS, apple hasn’t created anything new here lol.

  • Kevin S.

    The problem with posts like this is that there are 3 kinds of people in the world: die hard Windows/Microsoft fans, Apple fans, and Linux fans. It always seems to just come to a shouting match between the Microsoft and Apple fans, (although it is somewhat amusing), It really comes down to somebody thinking that their way of doing things is better automatically and without bothering to really test the other side…and when I say test, I mean actually use it, not give up after 5 minutes. I know there are problems with Microsoft, and there are problems with Apple too, but they both provide software/hardware that some people love to use. Like I said, comments to posts like this are amusing, until I start to see people arguing facts that are incorrect, because then I start to really enjoy the comments to see some people’s ignorance. There are really 3 ways to go: Microsoft, Apple, or Linux. The only time consumers start to actually benefit from competition between software companies is when they actually take an honest evaluation of each company’s products to see what is best and which ones they like the best for their own personal uses…as apposed to somebody only ever using Mac their whole life, or Windows their whole life and not even giving the other side a chance to prove their usefulness.

  • Kevin S.

    The problem with posts like this is that there are 3 kinds of people in the world: die hard Windows/Microsoft fans, Apple fans, and Linux fans. It always seems to just come to a shouting match between the Microsoft and Apple fans, (although it is somewhat amusing), It really comes down to somebody thinking that their way of doing things is better automatically and without bothering to really test the other side…and when I say test, I mean actually use it, not give up after 5 minutes. I know there are problems with Microsoft, and there are problems with Apple too, but they both provide software/hardware that some people love to use. Like I said, comments to posts like this are amusing, until I start to see people arguing facts that are incorrect, because then I start to really enjoy the comments to see some people’s ignorance. There are really 3 ways to go: Microsoft, Apple, or Linux. The only time consumers start to actually benefit from competition between software companies is when they actually take an honest evaluation of each company’s products to see what is best and which ones they like the best for their own personal uses…as apposed to somebody only ever using Mac their whole life, or Windows their whole life and not even giving the other side a chance to prove their usefulness.

  • Keith Cromm

    What these companies should really be doing is enabling (what I call) “MyCloud”.
    Make your PC at home where the data is stored.  With it always on & connected to the internet, you can then ‘sync’ your devices over the internet to your own “server”, .e.g., “MyCloud”.
    I don’t care nor want to store my data on some big corporation’s server disks where they learn all about me and have the legal requirement to give it to the government when the gov’t demands the company to give it to the gov’t.
    Funny, retool the letters in MyCloud or “iCloud” and yo get MyCould or iCould, as in, I could (and should be able to) do this all myself without surrendering my files to Big Step-Brother (e.g., corporations) who readily share it with Big Brother.

    • http://macrosofter.wordpress.com/ quikboy

      Stop being paranoid. Unless you’re some bad guy, you probably don’t even come up.

      Also, the solution already exists: Windows Home Server.

  • Keith Cromm

    What these companies should really be doing is enabling (what I call) “MyCloud”.
    Make your PC at home where the data is stored.  With it always on & connected to the internet, you can then ‘sync’ your devices over the internet to your own “server”, .e.g., “MyCloud”.
    I don’t care nor want to store my data on some big corporation’s server disks where they learn all about me and have the legal requirement to give it to the government when the gov’t demands the company to give it to the gov’t.
    Funny, retool the letters in MyCloud or “iCloud” and yo get MyCould or iCould, as in, I could (and should be able to) do this all myself without surrendering my files to Big Step-Brother (e.g., corporations) who readily share it with Big Brother.

    • Anonymous

      Stop being paranoid. Unless you’re some bad guy, you probably don’t even come up.

      Also, the solution already exists: Windows Home Server.

  • Kevin S.

    Ha, yeah, I agree with that. That might be the one trend that I just don’t really want to buy into. Personally, I use SkyDrive to store documents and presentations on instead of using a thumbdrive to transport them to school and home. However, when it comes to more important things, I would rather I store them on my own hardware. I have my own server at home running Fedora linux that I would rather use to backup my computer to, and backup important files on. After all, if all your stuff is in the Cloud, what happens if the internet goes down at your house or you don’t have access to the internet?

  • Kevin S.

    Ha, yeah, I agree with that. That might be the one trend that I just don’t really want to buy into. Personally, I use SkyDrive to store documents and presentations on instead of using a thumbdrive to transport them to school and home. However, when it comes to more important things, I would rather I store them on my own hardware. I have my own server at home running Fedora linux that I would rather use to backup my computer to, and backup important files on. After all, if all your stuff is in the Cloud, what happens if the internet goes down at your house or you don’t have access to the internet?

  • rxantos

    Please.
    Skydrive and the misnamed iCloud are just online storage. Thats it.

    A Cloud does not only consist of storage. A cloud consist also of online applications and on demand renting computing power. Storage is just one of the elements of a cloud.

    Neither skydrive nor iCloud offer tecnology innovation on any level. Remote storage has being around since the ages of main frames. As for phone storage. Dropbox and others have being offering this a long time ago, they have realtime synchronization between  pc, mac, linux, iPhone, android, etc.

    Bear in mind, avoid using the cloud for private and sensitive information. The reason is that no mater what a company claims, their employees have access to the data of everyone. So if the information is private or sensitive, do not place it on the cloud or use encription ON YOUR SIDE. Which means do not trust whatever encryption the company offers. A company will never tell you that they are unsecure. Doing so would let them open for a lawsuit in case a disgrunted employee decides to take a hard disk and sell its data. So its in your side to protect the data.

  • http://profiles.google.com/rxantos Ricardo Santos

    Please.
    Skydrive and the misnamed iCloud are just online storage. Thats it.

    A Cloud does not only consist of storage. A cloud consist also of online applications and on demand renting computing power. Storage is just one of the elements of a cloud.

    Neither skydrive nor iCloud offer tecnology innovation on any level. Remote storage has being around since the ages of main frames. As for phone storage. Dropbox and others have being offering this a long time ago, they have realtime synchronization between  pc, mac, linux, iPhone, android, etc.

    Bear in mind, avoid using the cloud for private and sensitive information. The reason is that no mater what a company claims, their employees have access to the data of everyone. So if the information is private or sensitive, do not place it on the cloud or use encription ON YOUR SIDE. Which means do not trust whatever encryption the company offers. A company will never tell you that they are unsecure. Doing so would let them open for a lawsuit in case a disgrunted employee decides to take a hard disk and sell its data. So its in your side to protect the data.

  • Polly

    –> If you’ve purchased lots of music on iTunes, well you’re kind of locked in

    Not true.  Zune and the WP7 phone will play music purchased from iTunes, it reads m4a files quite nicely so if you want to switch to a WP7/Zune environment, you very much can do just that with no worries.

  • Polly

    –> If you’ve purchased lots of music on iTunes, well you’re kind of locked in

    Not true.  Zune and the WP7 phone will play music purchased from iTunes, it reads m4a files quite nicely so if you want to switch to a WP7/Zune environment, you very much can do just that with no worries.

  • Polly

    –> If you’ve purchased lots of music on iTunes, well you’re kind of locked in

    Not true.  Zune and the WP7 phone will play music purchased from iTunes, it reads m4a files quite nicely so if you want to switch to a WP7/Zune environment, you very much can do just that with no worries.

  • T Bone

    iCloud needs to be compared with Windows Live Mesh and not SkyDrive. These services from Microsoft has been around for 2 to 3 years now, much mature and stronger. It’s one of those Apple hype.

  • T Bone

    iCloud needs to be compared with Windows Live Mesh and not SkyDrive. These services from Microsoft has been around for 2 to 3 years now, much mature and stronger. It’s one of those Apple hype.