More fun with numbers from Microsoft

By Kip Kniskern | In News | Posted November 28, 2012 10 comments

msft sq logoYesterday, we posted on news that Outlook.com now has more than 25 million active users, and in perhaps a spirit of sharing over the holiday season, Microsoft is continuing to talk numbers.  In the past few hours, Microsoft has announced:

  • 40 million Windows 8 licenses have been sold
  • “several” Windows 8 apps have been downloaded 1 million times
  • Windows Phones are selling “4 times as many” as at the same time last year
  • “Black Friday” week (Nov 18 – Nov 23) was a big hit for Xbox :
    • 750,000 consoles sold in the US
    • Xbox Live sales increased more than 50% over same time last year
    • 14 million people were on Xbox Live on that Sunday alone
    • They racked up 72 million hours of use in one day
    • entertainment use of Xbox is up 43% over the same week last year

Not to be outdone, Azure posted some new numbers, too (emphasis in the original).

Since the inception of the authentication service on the Windows Azure platform in 2010, we have now processed 200 BILLION authentications for 50 MILLION active user accounts. In an average week we receive 4.7 BILLION authentication requests for users in over 420 THOUSANDdifferent domains. This is a massive workload when you consider others in the industry are attempting to process 7B logins per year, Azure processes close to that amount in a week.

These numbers sound big right?  They are. To put it into perspective, in the 2 minutes it takes to brew yourself a single cup of coffee, Windows Azure Active Directory (AD) has already processed just over 1 MILLION authentications from many different devices and users around the world.  Not only are we processing a huge number of authentications but we’re doing it really fast!  We respond to 9,000 requests per second and in the U.S. the average authentication takes less than 0.7 seconds.

Of course, and as Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer was grilled on in today’s shareholder’s meeting, we’ll have to wait until the numbers above have a positive effect on what for many is the one true number, the stock price:

stock price

…which took a bit of a beating with the sudden announcement of Steven Sinofsky’s departure, and hasn’t followed the meteoric rise of Apple, although Microsoft and Google have performed similarly over the past two years:

stock price compare

While many of these numbers can be put firmly in the “spin” category, painting a big impressive picture without much context, it’s nice to see firm numbers at all come out of Redmond, and just maybe they’ll have a positive impact on the stock price, as well.

Posted November 28th, 2012 at 10:44 am
Category: News
Tags: Microsoft
  • TheRickshaw

    Please explain what you mean by “firmly in the ‘spin’ category”? And what context would you like to accompany the numbers?

    • http://twitter.com/surilamin surilamin

      The easiest example is Windows Phones are selling 4x as they were this time last year. Well Microsoft has never stated how many total Windows Phones have been sold, so the 4x (while positive) is basically meaningless. Pretty similar to what Amazon says about their kindles.

    • Simon Johnny

      Putting a spin on things is a phrase used to describe media taking a bad(or sometimes good) event and telling you how it is in such a way that they turn (spin) the perception of it around so you think its good.
      In this case, Microsoft is making their bad numbers look quite good with their loose wording. It gives the impression things are going smooth when, the reality is they’ve not actually told us any firm numbers that we can quantify nor judge vs any other product.

  • TheRickshaw

    Please explain what you mean by “firmly in the ‘spin’ category”? And what context would you like to accompany the numbers?

    • http://twitter.com/surilamin surilamin

      The easiest example is Windows Phones are selling 4x as they were this time last year. Well Microsoft has never stated how many total Windows Phones have been sold, so the 4x (while positive) is basically meaningless. Pretty similar to what Amazon says about their kindles.

    • Simon Johnny

      Putting a spin on things is a phrase used to describe media taking a bad(or sometimes good) event and telling you how it is in such a way that they turn (spin) the perception of it around so you think its good.
      In this case, Microsoft is making their bad numbers look quite good with their loose wording. It gives the impression things are going smooth when, the reality is they’ve not actually told us any firm numbers that we can quantify nor judge vs any other product.

  • Simon Johnny

    “several” Windows 8 apps have been downloaded 1 million times
    Yeah, that’ll be all the users trying to re-install the bundled mail, photo, messenger apps to get them to work properly.
    I have some big issues with the apps, and its not because its a mobile system on the desktop. It’s things like them just not working, having such limited functionality they’re actually not worth using, or simply they don’t work and require you to ether reboot the system or in many cases, uninstall the app and reinstall it.
    Don’t even get me started on the updates from the Store. These should be done in the background away from the users view not some tiny text box you have to click on. What the heck were you thinking Microsoft?

  • Simon Johnny

    “several” Windows 8 apps have been downloaded 1 million times
    Yeah, that’ll be all the users trying to re-install the bundled mail, photo, messenger apps to get them to work properly.
    I have some big issues with the apps, and its not because its a mobile system on the desktop. It’s things like them just not working, having such limited functionality they’re actually not worth using, or simply they don’t work and require you to ether reboot the system or in many cases, uninstall the app and reinstall it.
    Don’t even get me started on the updates from the Store. These should be done in the background away from the users view not some tiny text box you have to click on. What the heck were you thinking Microsoft?

  • guest

    A lot more downside in the stock unfortunately.

  • guest

    A lot more downside in the stock unfortunately.