Report: Durango to Require an Internet Connection, Uses Blu-Ray

By Chris Poirier | In News | Posted February 6, 2013 10 comments

XboxLogoAs with all Durango news prior to Microsoft’s official announcement, take this with the appropriate level of salt, but Edge Online has reported several new details regarding the new Xbox.  Citing unnamed sources with knowledge of the new hardware,  Edge claims that it appears as though the rumors surrounding the inability to play used games on Durango may be true. According to the report, games will come with a single use activation code, similar to their PC counterparts. To that end, Durango allegedly will require an internet connection to function. Will this mean that the new Xbox will incorporate Steam-like functionality, allowing users the ability to install games registered to their Xbox Live account on multiple consoles? What about users in rural areas without reliable access to broadband?

The second rumored inclusion, that of a built in Blu-Ray drive, is a bit less earth shattering. It’s no secret that DVD media and graphically intense content doesn’t mix. Rather than elect to use a proprietary optical format (as Nintendo has done with the Wii U), the upcoming console is said to use a high speed Blu-Ray drive. Accordingly, this also implies that Durango will be capable of playing Blu-Ray movies from the onset.  Third, and perhaps most exciting, if the source is to be believed, Durango will be packing some considerable technical muscle; including an eight core AMD custom CPU operating at 1.6ghz/core, D3D11.x graphics, and 8gb of DDR3 RAM. Lastly, as widely speculated, an incremental upgrade to the kinect hardware is said to be released alongside Durango, boasting increased responsiveness and more precise motion tracking.  Following last month’s X-Surface debacle , an appropriate level of skepticism is a must; that being said, with all signs to the Playstation 4 being announced February 20, we expect to see Microsoft following suit soon after. The next console generation will be upon us sooner than you think!

Posted February 6th, 2013 at 11:02 am
Category: News
Tags: Durango, Kinect, Xbox, Xbox LIVE, rumor
  • http://gregsedwards.wordpress.com/ Greg Edwards

    There would be such a public outcry over this kind of tactic. I’m not saying it couldn’t succeed, however. Publishers would need to lower the price of games to the $20-30 range (on par with Blu-ray movies). Microsoft would need to provide a cheap on-demand subscription model for games, and/or partner with publishers to create exempt “rental” versions of games for existing outlets like Blockbuster, Redbox, and Gamefly.

    • Chris Poirier

      The public outcry has already begun – following word that the next generation Xbox may not support used games, GameStop shares dropped a staggering 6 percent.

  • http://gregsedwards.wordpress.com Greg Edwards

    There would be such a public outcry over this kind of tactic. I’m not saying it couldn’t succeed, however. Publishers would need to lower the price of games to the $20-30 range (on par with Blu-ray movies). Microsoft would need to provide a cheap on-demand subscription model for games, and/or partner with publishers to create exempt “rental” versions of games for existing outlets like Blockbuster, Redbox, and Gamefly.

    • Chris Poirier

      The public outcry has already begun – following word that the next generation Xbox may not support used games, GameStop shares dropped a staggering 6 percent.

  • Sri

    Could be that it would only phone home at first install/activation step with occasional (ie. monthly) check, kinda like Steam (a bit less evil than always-on).

    Either way, still a blow to the used game market & consumers. A gamer wouldn’t be able to go to a friends house & bring a game to play.

    I’m assuming that PS4 would do the same, unless if Xbox is out first & there’s enough backlash that Sony changes course. Game publishers would of course heavily favor platforms with strong DRM.

  • Sri

    Could be that it would only phone home at first install/activation step with occasional (ie. monthly) check, kinda like Steam (a bit less evil than always-on).

    Either way, still a blow to the used game market & consumers. A gamer wouldn’t be able to go to a friends house & bring a game to play.

    I’m assuming that PS4 would do the same, unless if Xbox is out first & there’s enough backlash that Sony changes course. Game publishers would of course heavily favor platforms with strong DRM.

  • JJ

    Nah rumor about the activation code is just a rumor, an unlikely rumor as well. It would be just one of those wasting money on random research kind of pointless paper. And the conclusion would suggest it is a bad approach if the researchers have any common sense about providing a product and service. As to why waste money on such research paper? It is research.

    • Chris Poirier

      Hopefully you’re right. It’d be a drastic step for Microsoft to implement solely to appease publishers, and strikes me as an unnecessarily risky move. As others have shown us in the past, always-on DRM usually does more harm than good.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jer-Ming-Chen/833833653 Jer Ming Chen

    Nah rumor about the activation code is just a rumor, an unlikely rumor as well. It would be just one of those wasting money on random research kind of pointless paper. And the conclusion would suggest it is a bad approach if the researchers have any common sense about providing a product and service. As to why waste money on such research paper? It is research.

    • Chris Poirier

      Hopefully you’re right. It’d be a drastic step for Microsoft to implement solely to appease publishers, and strikes me as an unnecessarily risky move. As others have shown us in the past, always-on DRM usually does more harm than good.